Welcome to InspirePilots.com

Join the leading DJI Inspire community for free!

Battery recycle

Discussion in 'Inspire 1 Help' started by Roy Ben Anat, Jul 13, 2016.

  1. Roy Ben Anat

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Israel
    Hi guys
    I have a simple question about the Inspire 1 battery - I would like to do battery recycle, now they on 10%
    How long can I leave like that before I need to fully charge them again?

    Thanks for helping
    Roy
     
  2. huppe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Messages:
    945
    Likes Received:
    342
    First off all do a FULL charge of your battery.I mean a FULL charge.Go outside and start your Inspire and fly a few feet up in the air.Check your battery on your tablet.If it's ok you get the message that everything is fine.
    You can check if a total discharge is needed.A message will show that it's needed.
    Fly your battery till you get the message of low level battery and ignore this.Get your Inspire close to you and a few feet above ground.Keep it in the air 'till you see that level is under 5%.Slowly land and charge battery to 100% and your ok. It's about every 20 times you use your battery that this is needed.
    But I repeat always start with a 100 % battery.Every flight!
    Even when your level is 60% and you start the other day.Charge to 100%
    Keeping your Inspire in the air 'till you reach 5% needs a little work.
    Good luck
     
  3. Kestrel aerial Video NI

    Joined:
    May 15, 2016
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hi
    I got the message that a battery needed a full re-cycle so after I finished flying it there was about 25% on it. I set it on ground with the motors running (no blades attached) watching the % left on the battery. When it got to 10% it switched off!! Very shocked and very glad that it was sittling on the ground at the time! Ive never landed with less than 18% but the question is; is this normal? would it have happened in the air??
    Thanks
     
  4. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,788
    Likes Received:
    4,435
    Yes, it would have happened in the air.
    This is the very reason you have to calibrate the fuel gauge. In your example the battery 'thought' that zero or low voltage cut off level was actually 10%!
    I do mine every 20 cycles whether I get a prompt or not.
    I also never fly by the percentage displayed since this is estimated whereas cell voltages are measured and absolute.
     
  5. Mancheman

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    14
    In my opinion, for long-term, effective battery maintenance no Inspire pilot should be without Alex Proto's Inspire Angel (other models available for most/all DJI batteries). This discharges batteries safely either for storage or when a full cycle is required. I've been using one for some months and it works perfectly....no guessing, no hovering around on winter days. Probably the best $80 you can spend on your Inspire.
    I'm not related or have any connection to Alex apart from being a one-purchase customer.
    Website >> Phantom Angel
     
  6. Kestrel aerial Video NI

    Joined:
    May 15, 2016
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thank you..Im glad I asked...so when my battery said 10% it was actually 0% is that correct? Just one more question..what should the cell voltage be at when fully charged and at what level cell voltage shoould 30% battery be (thats the level I have the low battery warning set at) thats for aTB47...thanks
     
  7. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,788
    Likes Received:
    4,435
    Yes, your indicated 10% was actually 0% so could have been nasty!
    A fully charged pack will show around 4.3v per cell but this will vary slightly depending on how new/how many cycles the pack has had on it. You may find older packs don't quite get to 4.3v
    It's almost impossible to indicate a fixed voltage for 30% as if you ask 10 people you will get 10 different answers.
    There isn't really a direct correlation between voltage and percentage discharge since it will depend on some variables (how heavy the load, how old the pack is, how much the internal resistance of the cells has increased etc).
    However, if you fly until your cells are circa 3.4v under load then when you land and stop the motors they will rebound to around 3.7v per cell which is perfect.
    This will equate to around 20% left in the pack or 900mAh.
    Hope that helps
     
  8. Kestrel aerial Video NI

    Joined:
    May 15, 2016
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thank You Editor for that very helpful and informative reply. I will definitley pay more attention to the voltage as I had never looked at it. I m also going to completely re-cycle my batteries as Ive flown all of them approx 40 times and Ive never completely discharged them. Ive only ever oncle landed with less than 20 % but youve almost certainly save me an engine failure in the air if I'd kept on. Kind Regards Michael
     
    The Editor likes this.
  9. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,788
    Likes Received:
    4,435
    Yes, with that many charge/discharge cycles on them they are almost definitely out of 'The guage' calibration (as you saw on your 10% issue).
    Conversely, the opposite can happen as well - you can find that the firmware is reporting 0% bit you actually get another 90 seconds out of the pack before it shuts down. This means you can fly longer until you get to your indicated 30% or 20% because the zero point is wrong.
    In any case, I would get used to flying by voltage as it is safer IMO.