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Caution.............

Discussion in 'Inspire 1 Discussion' started by lrwskyfilms, Feb 18, 2015.

  1. lrwskyfilms

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    "after reading about a man that shut his motors off mid flight I thouht I would check in the simulator, it would appear that if you bank to the left and backwards and for some unknown reason push the left stick down and right you will indeed shut the motors down and destroy your machine. Dji need to address this so it can't be done once altitude is a couple of feet.

    Dave"

    Just seen this on another forum and this thread;
    http://forum.dji.com/forum.php?mod=viewthread&tid=7895&extra=page=1&page=3&lang=en

    not good, DJI need to sort this ASAP!
     
    #1 lrwskyfilms, Feb 18, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2015
  2. Kilrah

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    Perfectly normal, that's the CSC move (both sticks in the corner). It's been used on pretty much all multicopters for a decade with no issue... precisely because there's no reason to do it in flight.

    People should calm down with their "OMG NO WAI CANT BE FIX IT NOW" and rather sit down, learn and use some common sense.
     
    #2 Kilrah, Feb 18, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2015
  3. lrwskyfilms

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    Agree, but I believe some inexperienced (dare I say that) pilots may get into a situation, panic and move sticks in to the CSC position. As long as everyone is may aware that this can happen, hopefully it'll stop I1's hitting the deck.
     
  4. gray52

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    If you hold the left stick down when desending fast for more than 3 seconds will that stop the motors as in the phantom series. Hence why they brought out the transmitter with a stop on that stick.
     
  5. IrishSights

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    Sorry, It doesn't do that in the Phantom series, unless there is no descending movement.
     
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  6. Kilrah

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    And it doesn't do it on the inspire either. Only stops when on the ground.
     
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  7. damoncooper

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    CSC stick positions are there in case you need to ditch, or emergency power-down the motors, where there may be danger to people or property.

    Think of it as a "kill switch" in case of emergency. Be careful not to invoke if not needed.
     
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  8. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    +1

    Correct..... There are times when you may need to crash your Inspire into the ground in order to prevent an accident or injury.
    In fact it's part of CAA stipulation if you are doing aerial work that you must have an 'exit/ditch strategy in the event of equipment malfunction.
    It's always been available in the R/C world for safety reasons...... You would not want a petrol driven 650 size heli ploughing into a crowd of people with the rotors going max rpm :eek:
     
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  9. gray52

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    You can always experiment on the sim. You can make it drop out of the sky and less costly lol.
     
  10. Rig

    Rig

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    If someone cuts their engines mid-flight by doing this "on accident," then they clearly shouldn't be flying in the first place. Consider it a Darwin function for the ignorant. I for one would love to hear the excuses as to why a Mode 2 pilot would have a need to be spinning CW, dropping altitude, and pitching rear/left, all at maximum input. This is not an aerobatics MR last time I checked.
     
  11. Jre

    Jre

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    Hahaha, thanks for the end-of-day laugh. Definitely needed it.

    Yea, if people can't RTFM and also fail to start/practice with a $40-100 toy quad, then they should not be flying an Inspire 1, especially not as their first RC aircraft. I mean they can do whatever the F they want, but don't come to forums and complain about a well-known by-design CSC that's clearly pointed out in the manuals.
     
  12. Rig

    Rig

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    They won't! They'll complain that the engines cut out completely on their own, or something broke mid flight! They didn't do anything wrong, they swear!
     
  13. Nathan Funk

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    It's actually not that ridiculous to contemplate the occurrence of an CSC mid-flight.

    If you wanted to achieve a shot where you took the point of view of something / someone that was looking up toward the sky while falling back towards the earth then I think the CSC stick position would be the best way to achieve it. It's the only way to get as much vertical vantage as you can with the camera ... and the spiraling descent would create a very interesting dizziness or disorientating effect. This move could be purposeful and yet because of the CSC limitation, many have suffered (including myself) a catastrophic result. I think it's kind of ignorant to assume that anyone who's suffered this fate is worthy of a Darwin award. I know this CSC is a long-standing design, but perhaps it's time to evolve, as we inevitably do, and allow for the full, unrestricted maneuverability of the aircraft.

    I can think of a variety of alternative "kill switch" methods starting first with giving the user the ability to activate or deactivate the CSC setting at their discretion. A second solution would be a dedicated button on the remote that you'd have to double tap.

    Just throwing it out there.

    Apologize to all the veterans who'd rather assert their dominance over less experienced pilots then contemplate alternative programming.
     
  14. IrishSights

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    You are out of line with the the tongue in check apology in your last paragraph and not called for in an open forum where all views can be aired contributing to the collective community experience. Your comments are welcomed.

    Dominance is a choice to be dominated over.
     
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  15. Kilrah

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    In principle yes, but in practice you'd do the same input combination but with a 1/4th of the throw needed to trigger CSC. Your shot wouldn't look too good if you were turning around at a rate of a full turn every 2 seconds and zooming away at 50mph.
     
  16. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    Like it or hate it - CSC is here to stay I'm afraid.
    This has been debated over on the R&D forum - it isn't going to be taken away anytime soon.
     
  17. r4nd0m

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    thats why I love a fully programmable transmitter and not a fixed function one with hard coded commands ....

    I do get the point and have crashed models on purpose before to avoid incidents but a safety feature that can be activated by accident isnt a true safety feature I am afraid ...

    unfortunately there isnt even something like a quick spool up option in case of reactivation like you have it on a heli - just using your reference here - to quickly re-engage ...

    from a development perspective I believe there are other combinations possible than the need to use CSC when the model is in flight ...
     
  18. amkorp

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    [​IMG]

    All of the above stick combinations shut off motors (in flight or otherwise).
    This is for the Phantom 2 Naza-M controller. I'm not certain if this is the same for the flight controller used in the Inspire, but it may be.

    As a side note, the above stick inputs would NEVER be required during normal flight.
     
    #18 amkorp, Jul 21, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2015
  19. The Editor

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    It is nothing to do with the transmitter. It is a Flight Controller command that must see 100% full throw on four axis from the receiver in order to arm/disarm the esc's.
    It would be exactly the same if you connected a Futaba 18MZ I'm afraid.
     
  20. mdomeny

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    as long as the i1 is moving it will not shut down with left stick at 6o'clock. you can check it by turning on the motors (no props on) and move it up and down. it will try alter the motors but not stop them until you stop moving (staying) in one place holding it.
    i go down left stick down all the time. one has to keep in mind not to go both sticks in either corner. taht is CSC and only for emergency...