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Center of Gravity

Discussion in 'Inspire 1 Discussion' started by damoncooper, Dec 6, 2015.

  1. damoncooper

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    Courtesy another poster, but thought I'd share here. "X" marks the spot as they say.

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1449416844.654647.jpg
     
    ringolong likes this.
  2. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    Hey Damon, I saw that pic a while back, can't remember where though. Unfortunately all it shows is the centre of the prop shafts in one plane, not COG.
    For COG the craft would need to be in flying mode (landing gear up) and a balance point has to be taken not only on the x-y axis but also z axis.
    Additionally, the COG will change dependant on payload. Imagine (if it were possible) a Red Epic slung from the belly on the existing mount. The string method would still show COG as the centre of the motors when in reality it would be much lower and also a long way forward.
     
  3. damoncooper

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    Yes, of course. With Z-axis the CG point will be slung low on the Inspire as all weight is beneath the props when landing gear is up.

    CG on the fore-aft axis is what I was referring to above, I should have clarified, unloaded, with no camera attached.

    The camera moves it forward a touch, more with the X5 than X5 I would think.

    Just caring about this as I'm mounting extra batteries.
     
  4. Vincenzo

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    Uhm, that's just a geometrical characteristic. The only relation of the spot you found with the XY position of the COG depends on how the Inspire 1 designers located the 4 motors (probably close enough to your finding with the X3). The Physics textbook's way to find the COG is to hang the object from three different spots. For each position the vertical will pass for the COG so the intersection of the three vertical lines will be right in the COG :).

    V.