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DJI Flight Sim without Drone

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by MichaelRev1412, May 11, 2016.

  1. MichaelRev1412

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    Is there a way to use the DJI flight simulator without having to connect to the drone?
     
  2. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    No.
    There is a windows based SIM via SDK but it still requires connection to the aircraft.
     
  3. GuyNamedLindsey

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    Is it just me or does this seem like a strange restriction?
     
  4. damoncooper

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    It's a good thing. The actual FC is processing simulated input. You can somewhat realistically test out various gains settings for example, and how that effects flight handling in high winds.
     
    #4 damoncooper, May 11, 2016
    Last edited: May 11, 2016
  5. Rush

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    Nothing that can't be simulated... Without the AC


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  6. damoncooper

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    It's just software. That's what Bill said to Steve.
     
  7. Rush

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    I get what you're saying... took me a bit to process; was looking for Bill and Steve in the thread. But, it's like an aftermarket tune on any performance vehicle... the ECU only knows what it's told. It doesn't matter who's doing the telling. The software only needs to know the AC's response parameters and it can mimic the AC hardware. Admittedly, I do not know the coding strategies between the AC and remote, but there are some damn good real flight simulators out there that do not need to connect to any actual flight hardware.

    This did however get me to thinking (as I was tweaking my gain and exp values)... how long (and who's going to be first) until an auto manufacturer allows a similar level of performance control, where you can dial in steering, gas, brake, suspension, etc. based on curves rather than a button that toggles between comfort | sport | sport+ | track...
     
  8. damoncooper

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    Tesla :)
     
  9. The Editor

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    I think DJI has a hand in writing Tesla firmware.
    Last I heard they reduced the speed. :p
     
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  10. DrMrdalj

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    I can see several sound reasons for any manufacturer to keep sim locked to actual ECU... Only way to make some PC software to actualy and realisticaly mimics parameters of ECU, is by incorporating actual ECU algorythms and hardware protocols and its internal code in that sim - that would expose many proprietary code details to many code savvy users and open a door to code manipulation - in that way sim would get "developemnt platfrom" functionality... Moreover, in order to keep it actual, in such case you would need to update sim with each new firmware, same as you do with a bird. Naturally, there are fair and educated users with positive intentions, who could help to improve code performance, but there are also other ones who could harm your aircraft and manufacturers reputation. I think about it in a same way as about car engine chip tuning and similar mods, which can gain some performance on the expense of realibilty and legal status (emission, noise etc) and which mods are far beyond technical expertise of user (keep in mind that DJI and many others target customers who would like "idiot proof" product with "automatic everything" )

    There are similar options already for many hi-tech cars (such as BMW which I personally tested) but they are not exposed to an end user due to extreme impact to car safety and handling... Each automotive sport tuner has tools to dial in throttle response curve, brake balance, steering power and suspession stiffness in the midle of the race - but these software tools are not legal for everyday use due to traffic safety regulations as they can get average user in real lifethreatening trouble... If you ask technology leaders, such as Google, automotive future wil not get you more tuning options but less, as cars will get "inteligence of their own" in order to make "idiot proof transportation" ;)
     
    #10 DrMrdalj, May 18, 2016
    Last edited: May 18, 2016
  11. Rush

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    Fair enough DrMrdalj, I see the reasoning behind keeping trade secrets, well, secret. Still, software can mimic hardware, but I can understand the pitfalls. I suppose there's also the fact that when you port code from hardware to software, you have to maintain it for both iOS and Android, whereas when that code is embedded in firmware it's only written once. Some efficiencies there.

    Regarding aftermarket tunes... I understand what you're saying, though may not go as far as saying it's illegal to chip a car. As for liability, there are many vehicles out there with multiple variants of the same engine... they are just detuned for the cheaper models. That exact same engine performs at a higher level when purchased in the higher end model. So tuning an engine up to an already established performance standard shouldn't prove to be a reliability concern. There is however the condition you mentioned... where someone tunes an engine beyond it's stated performance standards. That does have the potential to impact reliability.

    Another thought occurred to me... flight sim on an iPad is pretty rudimentary from an operator standpoint. There's no 'camera' view, only your VLOS to pilot the AC, and on an iPad the AC disappears pretty quickly. Is it necessary to have all the nuances and fully functioning responses of the AC and ECU to provide the same training experience? I suspect much of the ACs performance specs are lost in translation with Sim on an iPad. It may be that I haven't used the Sim to its capability, but I did log about 5 hours with it before I spun my props for the first time.
     
    #11 Rush, May 18, 2016
    Last edited: May 18, 2016
  12. DrMrdalj

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    This is completely another interesting topic. As far as I am informed (and I should be, as automotive ingeneer by education) before any public sales car systems are tested in accordance to legaly imposed procedures, to get certified - for mechanical and electrical safety, noise, pollution, and many other criteria. When ANY mod gets introduced to the car, it is legal obligation of modder and user to get car recertified. Usually it takes officialy licensed certification lab to check license of modder, then to check documentation of materials and parts used in mod, and to measure final performance. As silly as it sounds, such procedure is obligatory in my home country even for tinting driver windows or for tinting stop lights... Due to its impact on noise, pollution, etc. such recertification would be obligatory for engine ECU remaps and other engine mods.

    Naturally, if your car can pass yearly technical check without noticing any of mods by responsible technician, then you can "bypass" this procedure and keep using your modded car without being fully legal. This is common practice, but it is not legal and by such practice you risk your insurance coverage as well as other accidental complications... It is not what I like, but that is how it is by the book...
     
  13. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    Unless it's VW. :p
     
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  14. Rush

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    VW.... Beat me to it. But we see where it got them.
     
  15. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    No, no, didn't you hear..... It was a rogue technician doing this on his own without the knowledge of any of the board.
    Now, if you will excuse me I have to sow my sides up because they have split due to me laughing so much.

    Maybe the same technician could now get a job at DJI working on firmware!
     
  16. Rush

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    While technically.... possible, I think that would speak volumes to the quality control and oversight processes in place (not) at Volkswagen, to say nothing of the implications to an ISO certified company that failed that kind of internal oversight and review. Easter eggs find their way into Microsoft software... those seemingly random keystrokes that invoke dialog boxes written at the whim of a coder for humor. Harmless, but they did get through audit. So technically, it's possible. But I think it highly unlikely that someone with the power to say yes/no wasn't aware.