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Flying in NYC

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Quadslo, Sep 4, 2016.

  1. Quadslo

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    Is is possible to make some of the shots seen in this video legally?



    Are there any places where are you allowed to fly a drone in NYC? Looking at B4UFLY app, it doesnt look promising.

    I have my drone registered and I will take a 107 test.
     
  2. William Gaddy

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    Well, it's a gorgeous video. IANAL, but unfortunately it appears to me that just about every single shot in here would not fall under Part 107, you would have to be a Part 107 pilot AND get a 333 Waiver AND a COA AND notify ATC AND probably a municipal film permit to convince them you're going to respect peoples' privacy... There are obviously a lot of airports and heliports in the area, so for a lot of these shots I doubt they would even grant an exemption.
     
  3. SanCap

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    The music/sound/noise effects are horrible!
     
  4. The Editor

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    Nope!
     
  5. AeroMirage

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    A DJI craft wouldn't even turn on the motors due to NFZs. No way this could be legal.
     
  6. slim.slamma

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    If you get the 107 I doubt if you'll ever get permission to do what you did.
    If your not as they say
    With the sh$t:p
    Then you shouldn't be flying in Manhattan or over the Hudson.
    NYPD catch up to you it's a 1k fine and they taking drones since Part 107 dropped:cool:
    Most likely your not with the sh$t:p
    Parts of queens and BK you can legally fly:)/:mad:
    Model Aircraft Fields : NYC Parks
     
    #6 slim.slamma, Sep 4, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2016
  7. slim.slamma

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    Motor's turn on all day everyday
    Just turn Geo off
     
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  8. slim.slamma

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    I am curious as to why DJI doesn't just blanket the city like an airport if it's apparently illegal.
    Living in nyc you get screwed because of the people that want to make money filming in the city. You can't fly as a hobbyist or commercially legally. I don't think the faa is being realistic. Most residents fly over the Hudson or East River which is shocking considering the air traffic. It's like the faa is letting the sport get out of control until something terrible happens. If you live in a major city part 107 is a joke for hobbyist and pro's.
    Nobody is getting permission to fly. 333 was part one of the faa comedy. All major airports class b your grounded authorised waiver my ass you get no approvals, period.
    Why am I studying for this part 107?
     
  9. William Gaddy

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    Hi Slim: My current understanding is that it's NOT illegal in ALL parts of the City (from an FAA NAS standpoint), as long as you have a Part 107 Cert, and stay within those rules, including airspace restrictions and waiver requirements. They just want you to stay away from IFR approaches (which, frankly, is a lot of the best of the City to view, including the Brooklyn Bridge). But said Bridge IS UNDER Class Bravo airspace, but Class B ends at 1500MSL, this is primarily for JFK approach. No airliner is buzz-bombing or barnstorming the BB, even on IFR... So flying, say *alongside* the bridge would be within Part 107, but you still would need a municipal filming permit and to check with the regional FSS first. Learning to read the charts, and having a FSS number handy is your best bet! You also can't fly above public roads without a waiver which rules out a lot of the City. So you could not fly directly above the BB -- you would definitely need a Part 107 cert AND a 333 Waiver for that, I think... Anyone correct me if my interpretations are wrong, please! NYC is pretty complex airspace and municipal regulatory system: upload_2016-9-4_15-35-40.png upload_2016-9-4_15-37-20.png
     
  10. slim.slamma

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    building inspection, simple photo, videography I have a ton of ideas but I don't see 107 making dreams come true:mad:
    That goes for any city or anywhere it's people. I can find a way that makes almost any flight somehow illegal.
    I like that map. Where can I find one. Sweet reference for me. I would love to really understand that map
    I've been flying in nyc for about 2 years. I just noticed commercial flight b lining for Lga off the Hudson lowering to 600 ft. I always assumed they maintain 1200 ft over the city. Understanding that map would help me a lot.
    It just don't seem like it's going to be a reward for doing all this farking homework.
     
  11. William Gaddy

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    For a map like this, download Google Earth, first -- then go to Google Earth 3D Airspace. Download the ",kmz" file for the US, and then drag and drop it on to Google Earth app (while it's open).

    Below, I've removed all Class Bravo and Charlie layers that are above 400 ft AGL, to give you an idea of the airspace. Basically, anything in the shaded volume you need ATC clearance and/or a waiver.
    Once you learn how to read a sectional chart the volume of the symbols and lines on it will appear in your mind's eye. That's one of the things the FAA is after by making you take a Part 107 AKT. Nevertheless, using Google Earth like this is a great learning tool to comprehend airspace designations.

    upload_2016-9-4_16-18-36.png
     
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  12. slim.slamma

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    Actually looking at that map the Wall Street area looks good.
    Then tmrw I'll find something that says its not good
     
  13. William Gaddy

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    Probably. This is like layers of the onion. First, you have to contend with FAA regs. Then you have to contend with State of NY regs. THEN you have to contend with NYC Municipal Regs. And depending where you are, like say a State Park like Jones Beach Rec Area, or a National Park, you will have to contend with those regs and restrictions. And you can certainly bet that the only constant thing here is that all of the above will change -- the onus is on you to stay on top of it.
     
  14. slim.slamma

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    Thanks makes my studying a little easier.
     
  15. Jason1234

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    Be careful with this. It doesn't depict surface class E extensions that require airspace authorization for Part 107 flights. It's also not official. The center of my local Class C is not correct and doesn't match the sectional perfectly.
     
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  16. William Gaddy

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    Jason, you are correct. It's also volumetric data from 2015. It is NOT current. Always refer to the latest FAA sectional chart published at faa.gov, and always check TFRs and NOTAMs before each flight. However, a visualization tool like this can be useful for a newcomer to learn class B, C, and D airspace. I wish they had class E volumetric data in this, but they don't. It's still a useful learning tool.
     
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  17. slim.slamma

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    I somewhat understand class E thanks for pointing that out but that map I needed that to refer to.
    So because of class E wall st area is no good. Class E is just a game crusher. You can't get up under it
     
  18. William Gaddy

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    In a lot of circumstances Class G underlies Class E at either 700 AGL or 1200 AGL -- the whole area is behind a magenta fade cordon, so I would presume anything not designated with a dotted magenta (Class E to the surface) or dotted blue line (Class D to the surface) is actually not Class E down to the surface. In NYC this is an interesting conundrum, because let's say for example you want to fly up and slightly over a building in the Wall Street area that's 800 FT AGL at top. Technically, you would be allowed under part 107 with the flying-near-a-structure limit, but you would technically be in Class E space once you got above 700 feet AGL. And you definitely could not exercise the Part 107 of "400 Aabove any structure" because then you would be at 1200 AGL and the Class Bravo starts at 1100 AGL. You definitely have to think in 3D with this stuff.
     
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  19. slim.slamma

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    @William Gaddy have you contacted any of the of heli ports?
    Is the BK bridge classified as an airport like the GW? Blufly app
    What about sea planes have you contacted any port bases for approval?
    I'm still getting familiar with all the Faa's acronym so I probably shouldn't be commenting but it's stuff I need to know:cool:
     
  20. William Gaddy

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    Hi @slim.slamma -- no, I have not. I've never flown in the NYC metro area. B4UFLY is for Hobby Part 101 folks -- and is in some senses more restrictive. If you're a Part 107 pilot you have to engage the whole procedure (e.g. contact FSS -- Flight Service Station -- first, they will tell you if it's kosher or not, or if you need a waiver, or if you need to fill out an authorization on faa.gov/uas first). You won't irritate anyone if you contact a FSS, they are there to serve you as a pilot (but you need to be a Part 107 Pilot!). You WILL irritate ATC (Air Traffic Control) if you try and contact ATC on the CTAF or Tower frequency for a ground clearance for a UAS flight with a two-way radio. Apparently that's a No-No.