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Looks like FAA missed another dead line

Discussion in 'Inspire 1 Discussion' started by brad90631, Nov 20, 2015.

  1. brad90631

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    So been checking the FAA web site for the new drone registration rules. In the press release they announced to release rules today. Well after 6 o'clock on the east coast and nothing on the FAA web site. I guess only us non government workers have to make our dead lines or find a new job.
     
  2. Ascender

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    I just read that the announcement is expected tomorrow.

    FAA readies drone registration rules

     
  3. brad90631

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    i just found the link also. i did not see that link about 30 min ago.
     
  4. Adelberg aerial imaging

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    Doesn't matter if your an Faa certified pilot and know the airspace rules and how to communicate with ATC and other pilots in the area. My insider tells me that drone pilots will be required to take parts of the current private pilot written tests that deal with airspace and communication. Leaving out meteorology, aircraft performance, aerodynamics...etc. drones will have to be registered and flight logs kept.
     
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  5. Joola

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    This is in line what with the FAA proposed rulemaking on UAS released in February. You can read it here.

    https://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/rulemaking/media/021515_sUAS_Summary.pdf
     
  6. brad90631

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  7. brad90631

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    I would be ok with that.
     
  8. Joola

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    wat?
     
  9. Kauaigene

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    Flight logs?...are you kidding me.
     
  10. SixtyMike

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    Adelberg-did your source indicate this would be a requirement for both commercial and hobbyist/recreation UAS operators?
    I ask because the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for sUAS applies to commercially operated UAS only. This is stated on page 8 at the beginning of the Executive Summary in the following:

    https://www.faa.gov/regulations_pol.../2120-AJ60_NPRM_2-15-2015_joint_signature.pdf

    For hobbyists/recreational use, Section 336 of Public Law 112-95 should still apply per the NPRM at the bottom of page 12. Advisory Circular 91-57A should still apply for hobbyists as well. Time will tell.


    Registration appears to be a done deal for commercials and hobbyists. A written test for hobbyists/recreational use seems a bit overreaching, but I do agree that everyone operating UAS needs to be cognizant of airspace and where to safely operate. As an example, how many folks fly without looking at a VFR sectional chart and checking for MOA's and military (VR/IR) training routes? Many have operating altitudes of well below 400' agl.
     
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  11. Jimmykjimmy

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    The Small Drone Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

    On February 15, 2015, the FAA issued its small drone Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”), entitled “Operation and Certification of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems.” The proposed rule would permit drone operation for non-hobby and non-recreational uses, thereby allowing, by regulation, commercial drone and non-hobbyist operations, under certain conditions.

    There are some significant limitations in the NPRM. Drones may not be flown over “non-involved” people, and must not be flown to distances greater than those which would permit the drone operator to see the drone at all times. So beyond line-of-sight drone operations (such as long distance drone delivery services) would not be permitted under the proposed rule. Night operations would also not be permitted. This could hamper fire and other emergency services, among others. And ATC clearance would be required for flights conducted within Class B, C, D and E airspace, which might prove overly burdensome to both ATC personnel and drone operators.

    Bear in mind, however, that the NPRM is a proposed rule and subject to change before it eventually becomes FAR Part 107 at some time in the future. The NPRM is not the law right now. The NPRM process is a long one, and public input might result in changes to the rule, favorable to some and unfavorable to others. That said, and much to everyone’s surprise, the FAA has proposed the exact opposite of what the drone community had expected.

    Although not perfect, the NPRM is, in this writer’s opinion, quite a good start. Public comments to the proposed rule may be submitted for consideration for 60 days following its publication in the Federal Register. The FAA has provided a complete summary of the proposed rule here, which is included below.

    Proposed drone requirements:

    Under the proposed rule:

    • an FAA airworthiness certification would not be required.
    • the drone must be maintained in condition for safe operation and prior to each flight must be inspected to ensure it is in a condition for safe operation.
    • aircraft registration is required in the same manner that applies to all other aircraft.
    • aircraft markings are required in the same manner that applies to all other aircraft, but if aircraft is too small to display markings in standard size, then the aircraft simply needs to display markings in the largest practicable manner.
    Proposed operator requirements:

    Under the proposed rule, pilots of small drones would be called “operators,” and they must:

    • be at least 17 years old.
    • pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center.
    • be vetted by the Transportation Security Administration.
    • obtain an “unmanned aircraft operator certificate” with a “small drone rating,” which never expires.
    • pass a recurrent aeronautical knowledge test every 24 months.
    • make available to the FAA, upon request, the drone for inspection or testing, and any associated documents/records required to be kept under the proposed rule.
    • report an accident to the FAA within 10 days of any operation that results in injury or property damage.
    Proposed operational requirements:

    Under the proposed rule, drones:

    • must weigh less than 55 lbs.
    • must remain within visual line of sight of the operator or visual observer.
    • must remain close enough to the operator for the operator to be able to see the aircraft with vision unaided by any device other than corrective lenses.
    • may not operate over any persons not directly involved in the operation.
    • may only be operated from official sunrise to official sunset, (local time).
    • must yield the right-of-way to other aircraft, whether manned or unmanned.
    • may, but are not required to use a visual observer.
    • may be flown using “first-person view,” but either the operator or the visual observer must maintain an unenhanced visual line of sight of the craft.
    • may be flown at a maximum airspeed of 100 mph (87 knots).
    • may be flown at a maximum altitude of 500 feet above ground level.
    • may be flown in minimum weather visibility of 3 miles from the operator.
    • may not be flown in Class A (18,000 feet & above) airspace.
    • may be flown in Class B, C, D and E airspace with ATC permission.
    • may be flown in Class G airspace are allowed without ATC permission.
    • may not be flown carelessly or recklessly.
    • require a preflight inspection before each flight, including specific aircraft and control station systems checks, to ensure the drone is safe for operation.
    • may not be flown by a person if he or she knows or has reason to know of any physical or mental condition that would interfere with its safe operation.
    • and no person may act as an operator or visual observer for more than one unmanned aircraft operation at one time.
    Proposed “micro drone” option:

    The NPRM also proposes a “micro drone” option, which appears to be based upon the Petition submitted by Brendan Schulman on behalf of my co-petitioner, UAS America Fund, in our action challenging the FAA’s Interpretation. The FAA states in its NPRM that it is considering the following, with respect to the operation of micro drones:

    • it would weigh no more than 4.4 pounds (2 kilograms).
    • it would be made out of frangible materials that break, distort, or yield on impact so as to present a minimal hazard to any person or object that the unmanned aircraft collides with.
    • it would not exceed an airspeed of 30 knots.
    • it would not travel higher than 400 feet above ground level (AGL).
    • it would be flown within visual line of sight; first-person view would not be used during the operation; and the aircraft would not travel farther than 1,500 feet away from the operator.
    • the operator would maintain manual control of the flight path of the unmanned aircraft at all times, and the operator would not use automation to control the flight path of the unmanned aircraft.
    • operation would be limited entirely to Class G airspace.
    • it would maintain a distance of at least 5 nautical miles from any airport.
     
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