Welcome to InspirePilots.com

Join the leading DJI Inspire community for free!

USA Civil COA-333 and 200' to 400'

Discussion in 'Certified UAV Pilots' started by kcobello, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. kcobello

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2013
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    51
    Location:
    Ransomville NY
    Just received from our Attorney the next 2 limitations of our 333. Of the 4 we have been updated on, even though I know what all 30 are, the 200' to 400' no flight without a COA is going to be another tough one. I think I read COA's can take up to 90 days to get? Im sure some flights we can do but to be under 200' and over 500' away from buildings and people is really closing the window on work. Mind you ALL 333 exempt holders have ALL these limitations. WOW...:)
     
  2. licensed pilot

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2015
    Messages:
    653
    Likes Received:
    278
    Location:
    CASA GRANDE, AZ
    Yeap, the feds went off the deep end on this one. The neighborhood kid (who can't even read an aeronautical chart or file a NOTAM) can fly at 400 AGL and take all the videos he wants, but a 333 operation (FAA pilot license) must stay at 200. Someone must have spiked the coffee at the FAA UAS Integration office that morning. :confused:
     
    kcobello likes this.
  3. 10forty2

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2015
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    3
    I agree with ya on this! As far as my remote-controlled bird, I'm still officially in "Hobby" status. I did the registration as required and have the number posted on the bird. I started Pilot Ground School a couple of weeks ago and intend to go through to get my Private Pilot License....something that's been on my Bucket List for a while anyway. That said, though, I see very few correlations, other than the general safety knowledge and the notifications that need to be made, between a Private Pilot and a UAS Operator. It should be a totally different class of license. Before I put my I1 in the air the first time, I had already called around to several local insurance companies to try to get coverage...ALL of them said that since the FAA hasn't come out with any specific categories or guidelines, I'd have to insure it just like any regular small aircraft. Needless to say, I'm flying VERY cautiously without insurance right now. Hopefully in June, the FAA will publish some common sense rules for commercial and public safety UAS operations.
     
  4. EMCSQUAR

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,659
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    N 44.895 W 93.354 Minnesota
    Really?
     
  5. WBTRC

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    5
    I guess running out to the burning house to get a video for the news is not not on the table for a 333 holder.

    31. At least 3 days before aerial filming, the operator of the UAS affected by this exemption must submit a written Plan of Activities to the local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) with jurisdiction over the area of proposed filming. The 3-day notification may be waived with the concurrence of the FSDO. The plan of activities must include at least the following: a. Dates and times for all flights; b. Name and phone number of the operator for the UAS aerial filming conducted under this grant of exemption; c. Name and phone number of the person responsible for the on-scene operation of the UAS; d. Make, model, and serial or N−Number of UAS to be used; e. Name and certificate number of UAS PICs involved in the aerial filming; f. A statement that the operator has obtained permission from property owners and/or local officials to conduct the filming production event; the list of those who gave permission must be made available to the inspector upon request; g. Signature of exemption holder or representative; and h. A description of the flight activity, including maps or diagrams of any area, city, town, county, and/or state over which filming will be conducted and the altitudes essential to accomplish the operation.
     
  6. SanCap

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    South West Florida
    Wrong!! You left the 2 most important sentences out of your post that precede that statement which say...

    If this exemption permits operations for the purpose of closed-set motion picture and television filming and production, the following additional conditions and limitations apply.

    The operator must have a motion picture and television operations manual(MPTOM) as documented in the grant of exemption.

     
  7. WBTRC

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    5
    You are correct, in rereading the limitations. I guess the moral is do not request to be able to film a spot of TV of Movies.
     
  8. SanCap

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    South West Florida
    I really don't understand why the extra limitations are there. You would think a closed set would be a safer environment to fly in???
     
  9. ianwood

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2014
    Messages:
    2,524
    Likes Received:
    192
    Location:
    Lost Angeles
    Closed set operations are scheduled in advance and tend to take place in urban, high traffic areas that also require film permits, fire and PD participation. This is often done with full or intermittent lock down of the area.

    The POA is an acknowledgement of the specific flight area and intended operations. You can often get the 500ft limit reduced to 200ft. I agree the 200ft AGL limit is a bit much but most of the time you're not limited by it. I have heard rumors of it being raised to 400ft in the blanket COA soon.
     
    SanCap likes this.
  10. SanCap

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1,328
    Likes Received:
    392
    Location:
    South West Florida
    Thank you for the information. That does make sense.