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Is it worth it?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by bonedrone, Jul 9, 2016.

  1. bonedrone

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    I'm going on a cruise in a few weeks. I am American, flying to London. It leaves from Southampton, UK, then to Brugges, a port in Germany, Talinin, Estonia, St. Petersburg, Russia, then Stockholm, Helsinki, and Copenhagen. I would love to take my Inspire with me but I'm not sure it is worth the hassle. I have been trying to research where it is legal to fly in these areas and I am finding the information difficult to decipher and confusing. Even in England it is difficult for me to understand all of the rules. I checked out the CAA website but was unable to figure out if I need a special license to fly in the UK. I was able to discern that it is illegal to fly above people over populated areas. I have searched the site multiple times (I'm sure someone will reply that the information is already on this website...), but I am unable to clearly figure out if I could fly in some of the areas and port regions to get some reasonably cool video. I would like some videos in port, and I of course would not expect to keep the drone in my cabin on the ship, but have it held by the crew, like they hold alcohol, until I was in port.
    I have seen people post that they have talked to the cruise lines and some have obtained permission to bring the drone aboard, but most cruise lines have a no drone policy. The trip has some amazing scenery, but I really don't want to spend my vacation fighting with people and worrying about whether I am going to get in trouble, so I am considering just bagging it. Any thoughts?
     
  2. The Editor

    The Editor Moderator
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    Without going into the legalities of flying in individual countries nearly ALL PORTS worldwide will be off limits for flying.
    Ports are international borders and have customs and border patrol stationed there.
    With the state of the world at the moment and the imminent threat of terrorism no international border or port will be relaxed about an SUAS in the air having a fly around the area!
    You are not (without special permissions) allowed to fly remote aircraft over international border regions unless you would like a visit from some sharply dressed gentleman turning up in a black SUV wearing sunglasses.
     
    John Archer likes this.
  3. huppe

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    A lot of the countries you mention will give you too much hassle.
    Like the Editor said there are too many rules and laws in each country.
    I say enjoy your cruise and leave your Inspire in it's case.:):):cool::cool:
     
  4. bonedrone

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    Yeah, a little frustrating because it is such a cool platform to get some amazing pictures. I would of course not use it in port. A lot of our excursions go off the beaten path, so I am contemplating just bringing it.
     
  5. worldsoutro

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    I agree with the posters above, I think it's going to be a huge hassle. I have been overseas quite a bit since owning the inspire and it's never crossed my mind bringing it with me because i would always have to worry above it. Going on the plane, customs, other countries laws and possibly being questioned
     
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  6. Richard-Inspire

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    I'm not sure I agree with you worldsoutro. Whilst I totally agree with the points The Editor made about ports (or frankly flying anywhere that looks inappropriate to a sensible adult), if you are going to be visiting interesting remote areas that sounds perfect for a bit of aerial photography, and providing you are non-commercial, I suspect a lot of places you visit will be ok to fly without a license (certainly the UK is). Make sure you wise up on the local regulations in each case.

    So, assuming operating within the law, I would say definitely bring it. I took a drone to Australia and have some of my best memories from flying around getting videos and photos. You should get some amazing footage. I didn't have any problems transporting it (in the hold, with batteries in my bag) through Dubia to Perth and back. alarmingly they didn't even stop me on two of the four legs. Four batteries in a bag couldn't look more like a bomb unless you wrote 'bomb' on the outside, so I was a bit surprised. Made me thing that if you know what you're looking for, you've probably seen them a hundred times before.
     
  7. Kilrah

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    When was it?
    Things have drastically changed in the last 6 months or so.
     
  8. Richard-Inspire

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    about 6 months ago (Christmas/New Year). What has changed? are you referring to people's general opinions or laws?
     
  9. PAFerg64

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    Good comments and thoughts, I've got the same dilemma. Heading on Mediterranean Cruise next month and I'm debating about the Inspire, to bring it or not ?

    I recently returned from a beach trip over the 4th of July and I'm glad I brought the Inspire along, flying in the mornings was great, the beaches were not crowded at that time. I called the hotel ahead of time and did some research on the internet about flying in the area. To my surprise another gentleman had brought his drone along and flew it in the morning time with me. He was even brave enough to fly it at night aimed towards the fireworks show. Some amazing footage.

    But taking it to Europe is a different matter all together, right now I'm leaning towards not taking it. I plan to call the cruise lines soon and inquire about their policy.
     
  10. bonedrone

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    Thanks for the comments. I flew to Chicago from Tampa last weekend and decided to take the drone for a test run through the airport, etc. I read all the Chicago rules and also people's flight experiences. I was on American. I tried to carry it on in its original case, as many posters have said they have gotten away with it. When I got to the monorail area which is secure, the lady must have had some type of sixth sense, as before I even was able to get to the podium, she snapped that it was too big, and I had to go downstairs and check it. I stuck it in the crate which measures bags and it seemed to fit, but to no avail. Unhappily I checked it, having taken out the batteries earlier and put them in another carry on. The case made it successfully both ways without any scratches, but if I decide to take it overseas, I will purchase a real travel case.

    I went down behind the Adler planetarium early one morning on Northerly Island. I read different posts about security guards giving people difficulty for flying there, even though it is legal according to all the Chicago drone rules. I quickly assembled and calibrated everything and took off right over the lake. I flew for about 10 minutes, all over water, and I started getting an audience, so I landed and quickly departed. A little frustrating that I had to be so clandestine, as everything I have read says what I did was totally legal. Got some nice pics however.

    I assume it would be the same way in Europe, meaning going to a fairly secluded area, and getting some quick shots before being noticed, and then landing. Also, the cruise lines say it is not legal to take on the ship. That is what I am most concerned about. I would just hope they would confiscate it upon entry to the ship and then return it when we are in port. There are many posts about people who have done this. I am still on the fence. I have a few weeks to decide. I am leaning towards bringing it, and worst case, I don't use it much, but I will have it in case we get to a cool place with an out of the way excursion.
     
    #10 bonedrone, Jul 11, 2016
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2016
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  11. Firebird

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    I am located in Germany and I am first time posting here, even I am following this forum for quite some time. I really appreciate the knowledge distributed here.
    It is not really difficult to fly in Germany as it is in general allowed. Restriction are line of sight, 100 m altitude, stay away from crowded people etc. Basically everything a responsible pilot would try to avoid is not allowed. There are different rules for professionals but basically the same applies.
    The most difficult part in flying in Germany are the people who complains about safety and privacy as soon as they see a drone. People getting more and more used to it, but it is easy to be trapped in a useless discussion. I am getting my license soon and can show any questioning person an official letter. This usually shut them up.
    But here is the critical point: you will need a liability insurance in Germany. I purchased one with a world wide coverage. If you have an insurance you are safe to fly in Germany. I would look for some quiet areas (just to avoid audiences) and than start. Enjoy the trip.